What should I feed my Parrot and Is this food OK to give to my parrot?

What should I feed my Parrot?

What should I feed my Parrot?

What should I feed my Parrot? and Is this food OK to give to my Parrot? are the two most common questions I get asked from existing and new customers of Parrot Essentials. Food is the single most important element of keeping your parrots healthy. What should I feed my Parrot? is a question which we should ask before even deciding on what parrot to get as a companion.

PARROTS & FOOD

Parrots are extremely intelligent and they apply this intelligence to every aspect of their life including food.

Based on years of personal experience I am sad to report that most of the companion parrots are either over fed or fed the wrong diet all together. This approach to feeding is very damaging to their health, can lead to string of illnesses and worst of all a bad diet can shorten the life expectancy of your pet by half or more.

How to tell if you are over-feeding your parrot?

Use this very simple method to find out if you are over-feeding. Fill the bowls with food in the morning. At around 7pm check if there is still food in the bowl. If there is any food left uneaten you are over feeding. If there isn’t, then you may be under feeding. This should include all the food offerings, not just the seeds or pellets. If you are offering fresh mix, fruit or veg this should also be accounted for.

By feeding the right amount you will keep your parrot in optimal health and safe money too by not wasting food.

How to choose the right diet for your parrot?

WHAT SHOULD I FEED MY PARROTIn our store you can shop by Shop by Parrot Species. Find yours and look at what is available and recommended.

If you are not sure and still have any questions, please post it on the website or give us a call on 0800 327 7511.

 

parrot diets

Complete Parrot Food

The complete parrot food is in the form of pellets and each pellet contains the exact amount of nutrients, vitamins and minerals for a healthy and balanced parrot diet. When using a complete parrot food, you do not need to offer anything else as part of the diet. However, a lot of people like to give a little bit of fresh fruit and veg. That is fine if the fresh offering does not exceed 10% of the daily intake. If it does, then the diet is no longer complete.

Seed Based Parrot Food

Seed mixes for parrots should not be high on sunflower seeds or other fatty nuts and seeds (for example peanuts). The occasional fatty seed or nut is OK but it really should be used only as a treat and not on a daily basis. This is especially important for parrot who spend most of their time inside the cage.

Fresh Parrot Mixes

Seed sprouts, mixed with fresh fruit and veg have a higher nutritional value compared to non-sprouted seeds. The mix is tasty and readily accepted by most companion parrots. This type of parrot mix can be easily adapted to mimic the food your parrots will consume in the wild. Here is a link of how we make our Fresh Sprouted Mix. We came up with this mix a few years back after having a lengthy conversation with the renowned Neil Forbes (Great Wester Exocotics) about a way of feeding our birds a fresh and healthy food.  In this article we describe Step by Step of how to sprout and prepare the Fresh Parrot Mix.

Benson’ story (an example of bad diet)

This is the story of Bensons. An African Grey parrot we rescued a few years ago, who sadly is no longer with us only because she was on a poor diet. Benson’s owner (a friend of a friend) could no longer look after Benson and we were asked if we could care for her. When Benson arrived, we were advised that all she was fed during her lifetime was sunflower seed and an occasional apple or grape. Benson was 20 years old (owner had her from a baby).

As a responsible parrot owner, I immediately started the process of changing Benson’ diet to a healthier alternative. I was shocked but not surprised when she immediately started eating the new food offering and completely refused to eat sunflower seeds ever again.
Sadly, Benson had a heart attack after approximately 3 years with us and the autopsy revealed a fatty liver and clogged arteries.

I knew that she would not have a long life but I honestly expected her to be with us for at least another 5 – 10 years. My conversation with the Vet revealed that most African Greys on a bad diet do not make it past the age of 35. Just to clarify the life expectancy of an African Grey parrot is 50 – 60 years.

How to Change your Parrot’s Diet

Start by asking: What should I feed my parrot? If you think that your parrot is not eating well or is too fussy and will not eat what is good for a parrot, simply start by reducing the daily food offering. In a few days, you will see that your parrot will start trying new things.

If you think that a change of diet is what is required, choose the right one for your pet and slowly introduce the new food over a 4 – 6 week period. During this period gradually reduce the old food and increase the new food offering.

As a result, you will have a much healthier companion pet.

For older parrots and birds who have been on a poor diet over a long period I would recommend pellets, not a seed or fresh mix. You can still offer a little bit of fresh food with the pellets.

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Simple Tips for Parrot Safety During Fireworks

parrot safety during fireworks

parrot safety during fireworksOur simple tips for parrot safety during fireworks.

Fireworks can present a challenge for pet owners, with them desperately trying to calm and sooth their beloved birds by offering them favourite toys or treats as fireworks thunder in the sky.

That’s why we’ve put together some top tips on keeping your parrot safe and relaxed this November. 

  • Put them in a comfortable place

It’s wise to keep your parrots in a safe, cosy place on Bonfire Night, so they can find comfort there when the fireworks begin.

Make sure you close the curtains to block out flashing lights, unless you find your inquisitive bird prefers to know where the lights are coming from, then it may be worth opening them slightly.

  • Distract them with toys

There may be a lot of noise, bangs and flashes going on outside, but you can distract them from this by giving them some of their favourite toys. You might even want to buy something new to play with to really keep them entertained during the evening.

  • Drown out the noise

Fireworks displays can be very noisy, particularly if you live near to large public events. So it’s wise to drown out the uproar with your own noises.

Turn up the volume on the TV or play some music, especially tunes you know your pet loves and finds soothing.

Fireworks events can be a bit unsettling to your parrot, but if you follow these few tips you should be able to ride through this time of the year without any problems. If you do find your bird to be really distressed by the displays, get in touch with the RSPA for more advice.

Famous Film Star Parrot Turns 90

movies

Parrot Treats Poncho Macaw ParrotA green-winged macaw named Poncho, who starred alongside some of Hollywood’s biggest A-listers, is still enjoying the best parrot treats available at the ripe old age of 90.

Poncho has featured in blockbusters including ‘Ace Ventura: Pet Detective’ with Jim Carrey and Eddie Murphy’s ‘Dr Doolittle’ during her illustrious movie career.

However, the retired parrot is living a much more sedate pace of life now, according to the Daily Express. The OAP bird retired in 2000 after sharing the limelight with Glenn Close in ‘102 Dalmatians’, as she became too frail to travel long distances.

Owner Sophie Williams threw Poncho a birthday bash that included a bird-shaped cake containing all her favourite parrot foods.

“Poncho is a real old bird now. But having said that, she’s in great health for being 90; she’s as lively as when she arrived here,” said Emma Small, Sophie’s partner.

Poncho Macaw ParrotShe added that while Poncho is retired from showbiz, she is still a diva on occasion. The bird hasn’t flown anywhere in more than a decade, with Ms Small claiming her lack of mobility is down to laziness from being carried everywhere.

The International Association of Avian Trainers and Educators states green-winged macaws often live 60 years and longer, although Poncho’s longevity remains impressive.

While Ms Small admitted the 90-year-old has a “few bald spots”, the parrot apparently still “keeps everyone on their toes”.

Ms Williams’ mother, Rebecca Taylor, took in the parrot after previous owner Gary Gero gave her up. Mr Gero provided animals for Universal and Warner Brothers movie sets.