WIN £50 IN OUR PARROT PICTURE COMPETITION

Parrot Picture Competition

Parrot Picture Competition by Parrot Essentials

Competition Winners

Thank you to everyone who took part in our September Parrot Picture Competition.

Parrot Picture Competition Entries

The Parrot Picture Competition is now Closed.

Thank very much to everyone who took part in our Competition. Below is a slideshow of all the Parrots who were brave enough to submit their pictures.

We have chosen our top 5 pictures and they have been published on our Facebook Page. The picture with most votes will WIN £50 to spend at Parrot Essentials and the 2 runner ups will WIN £25 each.

Start Voting and Good Luck!

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This month we are running a Parrot Picture Competition and we have 3 amazing prizes to give away. Enter our competition with the chance to Win and spoil your feathered friend.

All you have to do is email us a picture of your parrot doing something that you like.
The picture can feature your parrot posing for a photo, playing with a toy, enjoying the sun in the garden, going out for a walk or interacting with other animals and family members. Simply put,  post your favourite picture of your parrot or parrots.

To enter please email your pictures to admin@parrotessentials.co.uk
You can also share your Picture on our Facebook, Twitter or Instagram pages.

All competition entries must be submitted by 20th September 2017.
Then we will post what we consider to be the top 5 entries on our Facebook Page and let you Vote for your favourite picture.

The picture which receives the most Votes will Win £50 Voucher to spend at www.ParrotEssentials.co.uk and the parrot pictures in 2dn and 3rd place will Win £25 each.

The Winners of the Competition will be announced on 30th September 2017.

Disclaimer:
You must be 18 or over to enter our competition. By submitting your picture you agree that Parrot Essential may use your picture in social media or other marketing channels

This competition is sponsored by www.ParrotEssentials.co.uk

CHRISTMAS TREES AND PARROTS

Christmas Trees and Parrots

Christmas Trees and ParrotsThis time of year, nothing beats sitting in your cosy living room, sipping a hot drink by the twinkling lights of your meticulously decorated Christmas tree.

If you are the proud owner of a pet bird, however, there is more to consider when choosing a tree than the colour scheme.

The welfare and health of your bird or birds is naturally your top priority, and so researching which options are safe for your beloved pet is paramount. We’ve turned Parrot Essentials for further information.

Real Christmas trees

Not all real trees are poisonous to birds, although some have been known to cause problems for certain species of parrots. Pine is considered a safe tree for birds, but do be mindful of any sap produced by the tree, as this can stick to your bird’s feathers.

Additionally, pine has been listed as potentially harmful in some articles, but those mainly relate to wood shavings and so not relevant to bird keeping.

Further, even if the tree itself is not harmful to your bird, many Christmas tree farmers use fertilisers in the water used to sustain their trees and the trees are often sprayed with chemicals to prevent diseases and reduce needles from falling of the tree when you bring it inside.

Your bird is likely to want to perch on the tree, and may nibble on the pine needles while doing so. This is potentially dangerous, as pine needles are naturally prickly and can cause injury when ingested.

So, unless you plan to trek into the wilderness to chop down your own tree (good luck with that!), it is probably best to have an artificial tree, just to be on the safe side.

Artificial Christmas trees

Generally speaking, artificial trees are not harmful to pet birds, including parrots. However, bear in mind that your bird may still try to nibble on the branches of the tree, especially if it is very realistic looking.

As mentioned before, pine needles, whether real or fake, are prickly and can cause injury when ingested, so be mindful of this.

Christmas trees decorations

If your tree has been sprayed with fake snow, glitter, or any other decorative element, this can be poisonous to your bird (and humans too if ingested).

Christmas lights and decorations can break and become hazardous due to sharp edges (and exposed electricity in the case of fairy lights).

Cheaper decorations may contain heavy metals, which can also be toxic; and curious birds may peck on tinsel or ribbon, which can be a choking hazard or cause intestinal blockage.
All in all, if possible, it is best to try and keep your pet bird away from your tree altogether, for the welfare of both bird and tree!

Other Christmas plants

It is important to remember that Christmas trees – both real and artificial – are not the only potential danger to your pet bird in your home.

Many plants traditionally used as part of the Christmas presentation, such as Ivy, Holly and Poinsettia can be poisonous to pet birds, as well as popular decorative flowers like Chrysanthemum and Yew.

Lastly, and some of you may find this one particularly disappointing, Mistletoe can also be toxic to some birds, so un-pucker your lips and take it off the door frame! (Or at least hang it somewhere where your pet bird cannot reach it).

Merry Christmas Everyone.

With thanks to Exotic Directs for contributing to this article

What the Happy Parrots have to say?

Happy Parrot

Happy Parrots

Happy Parrots = Happy Humans
In this page you share some of the pictures sent to us by our Feathered Shoppers.


4 July 2017

Ellie Amazon Parrot
“👍Ellie says thank you🌻”
Bjorg
Rainbow Wooden Parrot Ladder Toy Large


 

 


27 June 2017

Tabletop Parrot Stand with Toy Hanger & Feeder - Coppertone
“Yuna loves her new tabletop parrot stands. Thank you very much.”
Lauren
Tabletop Parrot Stand with Toy Hanger & Feeder – Coppertone


 


27 June 2017

Replacement Vision corner Clips for Large Vision Cages - 4 pack
“Hi Anguel
The clips have just arrived, a perfect fit.
Thank you for your help
Great service and wonderful customer care
Very Kind Regards”
Roger
Replacement Vision corner Clips for Large Vision Cages – 4 pack

27 April 2017
Pak-o-Bird Parrot Backpack Carrier - X-Small
“c/o ‘Tilly’ inspecting her new ‘back-pack’ travel carrier! Though am afraid, not good photos, Tilly was very intrigued by it all + made herself at home!  Thank-you for email and for the little toy parrot present for  Tilly, which I have placed in her cage! The back-pack is wonderful idea, and though think that the food bowls are not well thought out, misplaced, it will be fun to take Tils ‘out ‘n about’ on her travels! Thank-you all again for your very quick response + good service, and, perhaps see you all at the ‘June 11th’ ‘Think Parrots Show’! ”
Averil c/o Tilly
Pak-o-Bird Parrot Backpack Carrier – X-Small


30 April 2017
Jungle Wood & Rope Ladder Parrot Toy
“Chiku loves her new rope ladder as you can see…..”
Nikki
Jungle Wood & Rope Ladder Parrot Toy

 

 


20 April 2017
Challenge Ladder Activity Parrot Toy - Small“Dear Ben,

I have ordered a small ladder for our parakeets on Tuesday evening.
I have received the ladder which is of a great quality and as a surprise on top of it a sample of mixed seeds.

It is not the seeds that made difference in your costumer service but the hand written thank you note attached to it.

Thank you very much!

Wishing you all the best and many happy customers.

Kind regards, ”
Elena
Challenge Ladder Activity Parrot Toy – Small


9 April 2017
Aviator Parrot Harness“Princess took to the Aviator Parrot Harness from the first time we tried and now she comes everywhere with us.”
Keith – Princess (the cockatiel)
Aviator Parrot Harnesses for all parrot sizes

 


 

13 Feb 2017
“I just got my order today (a less mess feeder large and a parrot stand). My Senegal parrot already enjoys the feeder a lot, he spent all of his day in there eating, lol!”
Dragon (Senegal Parrot) & GIGI PAPA
Parrot Food Mate – Acrylic Less Mess Feeder – Large


Kracker on a perch14 Dec 2016
“Vessey Highly delighted with my new perch and thanks for the seed if I ever need anything else I shall get a member of my staff to contact you.”
Best Wishes Kracker
Zoo Max Shower & Window Parrot Perch Medium

Orange-Bellied Parrot Emergency Rescue Operation

orange-bellied-parrot-chicks

Orange-Bellied ParrotOrange-Bellied Parrot’s population has been declining for years, but this year it has reached its lowest number so far. The Orange-Bellied Parrot is Australia’s most endangered parrot species with only 21 breeding birds left in the wild. Just three female orange-bellied parrots survive in the wild, with 11 males also surviving the winter migration from Victoria to Tasmania.

This week researchers have mobilised in a last-ditch bit to save this parrot species from extinction.

Dr Stojanovic and his team — which has also been working with swift parrot populations — will be flown into Melaleuca on Tuesday to begin intensive intervention to ensure wild nestlings remain as healthy as possible.

A crowd-funding campaign will begin tomorrow in an effort to raise the $60,000 needed to conduct the intervention program. To support the crowd-funding campaign, go to visit the fundraising page

GOOD LUCK!

Basic Species Profile
Genus: Neophema | Species: chrysogaster
Size: 22cm (8.6 in)
Weight: 40-50g (1.4-1.75 oz)

 

Colourization Adult:

Male-bright grass green crown and upper parts; deep blue wide frontal band, bordered above by light blue line; green sides of head, turning to yellow on face and breast; green/yellow abdomen, orange patch in centre; bright yellow undertail coverts and underside of tail; purple/blue outer secondary coverts; deep green central upper tail feathers. Bill grey/black. Eye dark brown. Female-in general duller than male; scattering of dull green feathers on upper parts; frontal band slightly paler; centre of abdomen has less orange; pale underwing stripe sometimes present.

Colourization Juvenile:

In general duller than female, but upper parts quite green; faint blue edging to feathers in frontal area, replacing frontal band; minimal orange on abdomen; pale underwing stripe present. Bill yellow/brown.

Beak & Feather virus breakthrough

Beak & Feather

Beak & FeatherPsittacine Beak & Feather Disease (PBFD) is a virus threatening the survival of rare Australian parrot species, including the western ground and orange-bellied parrots. These species have fewer than 50 birds remaining in the wild.

The disease, which can lead to starvation and death as feathers moult and beaks soften is one of the main threats to wild and occasionally captive kept parrots.

Last week a team for researchers led by Charles Sturt University revealed the molecular makeup of the deadly disease in the Nature Communications journal. The team has been working on finding a solution for this illness since 2009. SCU Professor in Veterinary Pathobiology Shane Raidal said the finding is a significant step towards finding new approaches to restore  threatened parrot populations.

“By confirming how the viral structure forms, we can begin to develop a vaccine to interrupt these processes, ” he said.

Barry Baker, Chair of the national Orange-bellied Parrot Recovery Team said, the virus has undoubtedly contributed to the Tasmanian species’ dwindling numbers.

“There was an outbreak a couple of years ago in the wild and we’re aware that some of the chicks had been affected by it and that certainly drove a lot of action to get on top of it”, he told AAP.

“A vaccine is a critical step that will make transferring brid from captivity to the wild a lot easier that it currently is.”

Psittacine Beak & Feather Disease (PBFD)

The virus causing this disease is a member of the Circoviridae. The disease is thought to be specific to birds, with parrots known to be particularly susceptible to PBFD. The virus is most commonly seen in Cockatoos, Macaws, African Grey Parrots, Ringneck parakeets, Eclectus Parrots and Lovebirds, but it is not limited to these species only.

The transmission of the virus from one individual to another is mainly through direct contact, inhalation or ingestion of aerosols, crop-feeding, infected fecal material and feather dust. It can also be transmitted via contaminated surfaces such as bird carriers, utensils, feeding dishes, clothing and nesting materials.

The main symptoms of the virus are irreversible loss of feathers and softening of the beak. In most cases the outcome is fatal to the bird and leads to premature death by the secondary fungal infections.

Prevention

Strict isolation of all diseased birds to halt the spread of the disease. DNA testing of all birds of susceptible species to rule out latent infection. DNA testing of aviary equipment and environment to test for possible contamination.

At present there is no know treatment for the virus.

Source: http://www.avianbiotech.com/