Shop & Save – Parrot Essentials Promotions & Discount Codes

2018 Parrot Essentials Promotions

Parrot Essentials Promotions

Parrot Essentials PromotionsParrot Essentials Promotions – Shop & Save by visiting our online Pet Store www.ParrotEssentials.co.uk 

Parrot Essentials has a large selection of Parrot Food, Toys, Cages, Accessories & Supplement. All in stock and ready to dispatch. Fast & Free delivery available across the UK!

 

Oct 2017 – Parrot Halloween Competition – Win £50

Halloween CompetitionEnter our Halloween Parrot Picture Competition for the chance to WIN £50 to spend on Parrot Toys this month at Parrot Essentials. Find out more about our Competition here.

Sep 2017 – Parrot Picture Competition – Win £50

Parrot Picture CompetitionThis month we are running a Parrot Picture Competition and we have 3 amazing prizes to give away. Enter our Parrot Picture competition with the chance to Win and spoil your feathered friend. Find out more about our Competition here.

End Aug 2017 Promotion

Parrot Essentials PromotionsThis Bank Holiday weekend we are Offering Free Delivery on ALL Orders over £19.99. Just Enter Code: ENDAUG at Checkout to claim your Free Delivery. www.ParrotEssentials.co.uk

Vulnerable Seychelles Black Parrot hatchlings take to the skies

Seychelles Black Parrot

Seychelles Black ParrotSeychelles Black Parrot – Every year in the palm forests of Praslin, the second-largest island on the archipelago of Seychelles, a group of birds is monitored very closely during their breeding and hatching seasons.

This shy greyish-brown parrot – perhaps overenthusiastically named as the Seychelles Black Parrot (Coracopsis barklyi) – cannot be found anywhere else on Earth.

The Seychelles Islands Foundation (SIF), a public trust which manages the unique endemic palm forest reserve of the Vallée de Mai on Praslin Island, painstakingly searches for black parrot nests and monitors them on a weekly basis throughout the season to count the number of eggs produced and monitor the hatching and fledgling stages.

This year 17 chicks hatched from monitored nests, according to SIF’s communication officer, Lynsey Rimbault.

“In the three seasons between 2012 and 2015, more than 20 chicks from monitored nests hatched per season but the 2015/2016 season only had two chicks hatch from monitored nests,” she told SNA.

Surrounded by predators

Seychelles Black Parrot ChicksWith only a few hundred of these birds left in the wild, the black parrot is listed as ‘vulnerable’ on the IUCN Red List. Threatened by invasive bird species such as the Indian Mynah and the green ring-necked parakeet, black parrot chicks are in constant danger from other aggressive birds, feral cats, rats and even invasive ants. Even the endemic trees in which they need to nest are under threat – especially the coco de mer palm trees which have often been the victims of poaching for their famous coco de mer nuts.

Rimbault says it is surprisingly difficult to confirm predation attempts at nests because usually very little evidence is found to link potential predators to the disappearance of eggs or chicks.

“We suspect that there have been cases of rat predation this season although there has not been any direct evidence of this,” she said. “In one nest, yellow crazy ants were observed with two healthy chicks, and when the nest was monitored the following week the chicks were dead. We can’t be sure but it’s possible that these invasive ants contributed to the death of the chicks.”

When the monitored chicks reached around 25 days old in January this year, the SIF team fitted coloured rings to their legs to allow identification and monitoring after they leave the nest. Each chick gets its own unique colour combination and number.

Seychelles Black Parrot Monitoring

The tiny fluffy white chicks that survive the perilous hatching phase slowly lose their baby feathers and after around 45 days, once their dark brown plumage has grown in, they take their first precarious flight out of the nest.

Although none of the rings from this year’s fledged chicks have thus far been confirmed from re-sightings, SIF has reported several observations of adult parrots feeding smaller parrots, which are thought to be the fledglings.

Fond Ferdinand – a new hope for the Seychelles Black Parrot

In addition to the successful nests this year in the Vallée de Mai and the neighbouring Praslin National Park, at least one nest is known to have been successful in another private reserve on Praslin Island called Fond Ferdinand, where an un-ringed fledgling was spotted in Fond Ferdinand.

“We only monitor parts of Fond Ferdinand and only a few nests per season so we don’t have data to give a complete answer on [the population size],” said Rimbault. “In general, there seems to be good breeding activity in Fond Ferdinand, but the nests appear to be more spread out than in the denser coco de mer forest of the Vallée de Mai.”

Seychelles Black Parrot PairThe sighting in Fond Ferdinand is encouraging news for the conservationists, as it was thought the success rate of nests in Fond Ferdinand was low this season, with only one chick from the known nests surviving to fledging stage. SIF believes the parrots might have been more successful than initially thought in this reserve and are considering undertaking more extensive searches next season to find undiscovered nesting cavities.

For now though, SIF is satisfied that the Seychelles black parrot has clawed through another hard breeding season.

“Our monitoring suggests that the population is stable at the moment and there is no cause for concern,” Rimbault told SNA. “The most recent population estimate was conducted in 2010-11 and the total population was estimated to be between 550 and 900 birds. This is still thought to be the case.

Source: Seychelles News Agency

CHRISTMAS TREES AND PARROTS

Christmas Trees and Parrots

Christmas Trees and ParrotsThis time of year, nothing beats sitting in your cosy living room, sipping a hot drink by the twinkling lights of your meticulously decorated Christmas tree.

If you are the proud owner of a pet bird, however, there is more to consider when choosing a tree than the colour scheme.

The welfare and health of your bird or birds is naturally your top priority, and so researching which options are safe for your beloved pet is paramount. We’ve turned Parrot Essentials for further information.

Real Christmas trees

Not all real trees are poisonous to birds, although some have been known to cause problems for certain species of parrots. Pine is considered a safe tree for birds, but do be mindful of any sap produced by the tree, as this can stick to your bird’s feathers.

Additionally, pine has been listed as potentially harmful in some articles, but those mainly relate to wood shavings and so not relevant to bird keeping.

Further, even if the tree itself is not harmful to your bird, many Christmas tree farmers use fertilisers in the water used to sustain their trees and the trees are often sprayed with chemicals to prevent diseases and reduce needles from falling of the tree when you bring it inside.

Your bird is likely to want to perch on the tree, and may nibble on the pine needles while doing so. This is potentially dangerous, as pine needles are naturally prickly and can cause injury when ingested.

So, unless you plan to trek into the wilderness to chop down your own tree (good luck with that!), it is probably best to have an artificial tree, just to be on the safe side.

Artificial Christmas trees

Generally speaking, artificial trees are not harmful to pet birds, including parrots. However, bear in mind that your bird may still try to nibble on the branches of the tree, especially if it is very realistic looking.

As mentioned before, pine needles, whether real or fake, are prickly and can cause injury when ingested, so be mindful of this.

Christmas trees decorations

If your tree has been sprayed with fake snow, glitter, or any other decorative element, this can be poisonous to your bird (and humans too if ingested).

Christmas lights and decorations can break and become hazardous due to sharp edges (and exposed electricity in the case of fairy lights).

Cheaper decorations may contain heavy metals, which can also be toxic; and curious birds may peck on tinsel or ribbon, which can be a choking hazard or cause intestinal blockage.
All in all, if possible, it is best to try and keep your pet bird away from your tree altogether, for the welfare of both bird and tree!

Other Christmas plants

It is important to remember that Christmas trees – both real and artificial – are not the only potential danger to your pet bird in your home.

Many plants traditionally used as part of the Christmas presentation, such as Ivy, Holly and Poinsettia can be poisonous to pet birds, as well as popular decorative flowers like Chrysanthemum and Yew.

Lastly, and some of you may find this one particularly disappointing, Mistletoe can also be toxic to some birds, so un-pucker your lips and take it off the door frame! (Or at least hang it somewhere where your pet bird cannot reach it).

Merry Christmas Everyone.

With thanks to Exotic Directs for contributing to this article

Orange-Bellied Parrot Emergency Rescue Operation

orange-bellied-parrot-chicks

Orange-Bellied ParrotOrange-Bellied Parrot’s population has been declining for years, but this year it has reached its lowest number so far. The Orange-Bellied Parrot is Australia’s most endangered parrot species with only 21 breeding birds left in the wild. Just three female orange-bellied parrots survive in the wild, with 11 males also surviving the winter migration from Victoria to Tasmania.

This week researchers have mobilised in a last-ditch bit to save this parrot species from extinction.

Dr Stojanovic and his team — which has also been working with swift parrot populations — will be flown into Melaleuca on Tuesday to begin intensive intervention to ensure wild nestlings remain as healthy as possible.

A crowd-funding campaign will begin tomorrow in an effort to raise the $60,000 needed to conduct the intervention program. To support the crowd-funding campaign, go to visit the fundraising page

GOOD LUCK!

Basic Species Profile
Genus: Neophema | Species: chrysogaster
Size: 22cm (8.6 in)
Weight: 40-50g (1.4-1.75 oz)

 

Colourization Adult:

Male-bright grass green crown and upper parts; deep blue wide frontal band, bordered above by light blue line; green sides of head, turning to yellow on face and breast; green/yellow abdomen, orange patch in centre; bright yellow undertail coverts and underside of tail; purple/blue outer secondary coverts; deep green central upper tail feathers. Bill grey/black. Eye dark brown. Female-in general duller than male; scattering of dull green feathers on upper parts; frontal band slightly paler; centre of abdomen has less orange; pale underwing stripe sometimes present.

Colourization Juvenile:

In general duller than female, but upper parts quite green; faint blue edging to feathers in frontal area, replacing frontal band; minimal orange on abdomen; pale underwing stripe present. Bill yellow/brown.