Moluccan Cockatoo – Profile & Care Guide

Salmon Crested Cockatoo

Common name: Salmon-crested Cockatoo, Moluccan Cockatoo
Latin name: Cacatua moluccensis
Length: 40 – 50 cm (15.6 – 19.5 inches)
Weight: 775 – 935g (27.1 – 32.7 oz)
Life Span: 40-60 years
Origin: Native to south Moluccus and eastern Indonesia
Noise Level: Shrill screech with quavering notes, out-volume any other bird, and are extremely loud.
Food, Toys, Cages & Accessories suitable for Cockatoo’s.

Moluccan CockatoosSalmon Crested CockatooMoluccan Cockatoo

INTELLIGENCE

Moluccan Cockatoo’s have incredible emotional intelligence, and are highly complex. These parrots are so intelligent that there have been many cases where they have figured out how to escape their cage, and are said to be equipped with a variety of technical skills that help them accomplish this.

TALKING ABILITY

Moluccan Cockatoo’s are recognised as one of the loudest parrots, and their vocal volume is considerably louder than most birds. Moluccan’s will scream for no reason, and will often do so in the middle of the night. Due to their loudness it takes a specific kind of household to live peacefully with a Moluccan. Moluccan’s are not known for their talking ability, however they are able to mimic a few words or more accurately put; yell a few words.

FEATHER PLUCKING

Moluccans demand attention from their owners, and when under stimulated or not provided with the adequate amount of attention they will easily become bored, and this will lead to preening. Consistent preening then becomes a plucking problem. Lack of attention can cause severe depression in these birds, as they are extremely social. Stress and boredom thus remain the main causes of feather plucking in Moluccan cockatoos.

HOUSING FOR YOUR MOLUCCAN COCKATOO

  • Moluccan’s are very large birds and need the biggest cages you can afford.
  • They require a lot of space. A walk-in aviary would be the most ideal cage.
  • Ideal aviary length should be 4.5m (14.7 ft.)
  • Minimum cage size should be at least 30-36 inches deep, 48 inches wide, and 6 feet high.
  • Provide them with a variety of chewable toys for mental stimulation.
  • Make available, sterilized pine cones, vegetable tanned leather items, hard plastic puzzle items, food finders, and different sized perches for mental enrichment.
  • Overhead misters or spray bottles for bathing a few times a week are ideal.
  • Allow your Moluccan a considerable amount of time out of their cage, because they highly dislike confinement.

FEEDING & SUPPLEMENTS FOR YOUR MOLUCCAN COCKATOO

  • Feed your Moluccan a high quality parrot seed mix or a complete parrot diet.
  • Supplement the staple diet with various fruits & vegetables.
  • Organic, and all-natural bird mixes are ideal.
  • Quality mixes contain a variety of seeds, nuts, dried fruits, and veggies.
  • Introduce calcium into their diets with the use of a cuttlebone or supplements like AVIMIX and BSP.
  • Fresh clean water should be available at all times.
  • Wash their food and water bowls on a daily basis.
  • Aim to provide a balanced and healthy diet and never overfeed your parrot.
  • Incorporate foraging into their feeding regime for mental stimulation.

FACTS

These birds are considered extremely needy, and constantly demand the affection of their human counterpart.

The world population is under threat as they are popular in the pet trade, and their IUCN status is vulnerable. As a result of the exotic bird trade there are  around 99,000 Moluccan cockatoo’s world-wide.

Their intelligence level makes them notorious cage escape artists.

Both males and females partake in the incubation process.

Moluccans will attack young coconuts by chewing through the tough outer layers to get to the soft pulp, milk, and are considered pests in coconut plantations.

How to choose the right parrot cage

How to choose the right parrot cage?

How to choose the right parrot cageOne of the basics of dedicated and caring bird ownership is providing your parrot with an adequate living space.

With all the different sizes, colours, and models of bird cages available today, it is very easy to become overwhelmed when shopping for a home for pet parrots and birds. Although it seems there are endless choices when it comes to the types of bird cages available, there are a few simple guidelines you can remember that will make the process of choosing one much easier.

 

 

 

 

Choosing the right location for your parrot cageLocation and Placement
The first of these guidelines is to decide where your bird’s cage will be located, and then shop based on what will work within the area you have set aside. The area should be away from direct sunlight and drafts, yet be placed in an active part of your home to encourage your pet’s social development. Parrots live in flocks and love to be part of the daily family routine.

 

 

 

 

Choosing the Right Size
Next, of course, is to keep the size of your bird in mind. While it is perfectly fine to keep a Finch or Canary in a small space, larger birds do require larger cages, and it is always better to buy as large a cage as you possibly can for your bird. Keeping a bird in a cage that is too small can lead to undesirable behaviors such as screaming, biting, psychological disorders, and feather plucking, to name a few. A good cage should be large enough for your bird to walk around comfortably, and fully extend and flap his or her wings. Don’t forget to take into account the space that will be lost when you add your bird’s perches, food bowls, and toys! Feel free to consult us for recommended cage sizes for your particular species of parrot or visit our parrot species  page.

 

Bar Spacing for Parrot & Bird cagesBar Spacing
When selecting a cage, pay particular attention to the spacing of the bars. Smaller birds, such as parakeets and lovebirds, require cages with bars no more than a half inch apart, to prevent them from squeezing through or becoming stuck between the bars. Many bird owners have been surprised to find that their pets are little escape artists! Those who own larger birds should look for bars that are placed horizontally rather than vertically in order to provide your bird a means of climbing and some exercise.

 

Open Top Parrot CageShape and Style
The style of the cage is also an important factor. According to some vets, round cages have been found to be detrimental to the birds’ psychological health. Therefore angled cages are far preferable. The larger parrot cages always come with some type of a stand and in most cases do have wheels for easy manoeuvrability. You can choose from open top, solid top and play top parrot cages for the larger parrots and many different style of cages for the smaller parrot species.

 

Quality and Craftsmanship
Assess the overall quality of a bird cage before you buy it. Does the cage appear sturdy and solid? Are there any loose parts or sharp edges? The best cages are made of stainless steel, which is non-toxic, easy to clean, and will not chip. The primary function of a bird’s cage is to protect your pet – make sure that your bird’s home does not pose any hazards to his or her health and well-being.
A properly designed bird cage will give your bird – and you – many years of use and enjoyment. You should remember that your bird will spend a great deal of time in his or her cage, and much like us, will appreciate some decorations to look at! Fill your bird’s cage with colourful toys, perches, and accessories to ensure that he or she is well entertained. With a little planning and careful decision making as well as free advice from the team at Parrot Essentials, you should be able to choose a cage that will meet all your expectations while providing your bird with a safe, sturdy, and secure living space.
All cages sold at Parrot Essentials are made of non-toxic materials. We do sell a wide variety of parrot toys as well – all made of non toxic material.

Call of elusive night parrot to be monitored by outback Queensland grazier

Elusive Night Parrot of Australia

The search for the elusive night parrot continues in outback Queensland with audio technology now being used to listen for the birds’ call.

Elusive Night Parrot Conservation at Nonbah StationRecorders are being placed in paddocks at Noonbah Station, south-west of Longreach to record the call of the elusive night parrots at dawn and dusk.

Night parrots have already been detected north-west of Noonbah at Goneaway and Diamantina National Park as well as at Pullen Pullen Reserve.

Ecologist with the Queensland Naturalists’ Club, Harry Hines, said they are keen to see if the population extends south.

“There’s a chance, particularly given the proximity to Goneaway, Diamantina and Pullen Pullen, where we know there is a small group of birds at the moment,” he said.

The night parrot was considered to be extinct, with no photos of the bird on record.

Small numbers of parrots have since been located across remote areas of the state and very recently in Western Australia.

Station owner also an avid naturalist

Noonbah Station is located south-east of Goneaway National Park where the night parrot was found only this year.

Station owner and avid naturalist, Angus Emmott, will move the two audio recorders around his property for the next two months.

“I’m confident there is a reasonable chance of hearing the call of the night parrot because it’s the same piece of habitat as the Goneaway Tablelands,” Mr Emmott said.

“The night parrots in this part of the world like [to feed on] the long-unburned spinifex (Triodia longiceps).”

The recorders have been programmed to only record for an hour and a half at dawn and dusk — the time when Mr Hines said the night parrots were likely to call.

The audio will then be put through a computer program where the birds’ calls will be picked up.

Mr Hines said the information would then be passed on to interested parties.

“We will contribute that to a much broader scale project that the University of Queensland is doing, surveying populations of night parrots,” he said.

Ultimately, it will be up to Mr Emmott whether the presence of night parrots on his property is made public, as the bird’s elusive and rare nature is highly valued.

Source: ABC News Australia

Making New Things Fun for Your Parrot

Making New Things Fun for Your Parrot

Barbara talks about Making New Things Fun for Your Parrot you

Making New Things Fun for Your Parrot

My Parrots just blow me away sometimes. Or perhaps it is better to say that training with positive reinforcement blows me away. I recently brought Delbert, my yellow naped Amazon Parrot to a new location for a photo shoot. He is fully flighted and an extremely competent flyer.

Before letting him out, I made sure the room was safe for a flighted Parrot. Windows and mirrors were all covered, dogs were outside and no one was allowed to open a door unless he was safe in his travel cage.

New environments can sometimes be pretty frightening to Parrots. Delbert has been around a number of new places, but not near as much as I would like him too. So I was going to have to really observe his body language and see how he responded.

What I wanted to avoid was my bird flying around the space in a panic.

My first signal that things were probably going to be OK was when he started chatting away while we were doing the final set preparations. He watched from his travel cage and starting asking “Ya wanna come out?”, “Are ya ready?”, “Here we goooooo”

Letting him look at the space for about 20 minutes was a great opportunity for him to acclimate. There are some things that usually evoke a fear response in Parrots such as things moving overhead, quick movement nearby…but sometimes it’s the things you don’t expect that you have to watch out for.

This is when reading your bird’s body language becomes super important. Although he had been looking at it for some time, a long narrow cardboard box was simply unacceptable. Any steps too close to that would send Delbert circling around the room.

Fortunately because of all his recall training he would land on my hand after a few laps. We opted to remove that box while Delbert was far away from it.

Another thing that proved a challenge was the backdrop. The coloured drape would occasionally move. This especially happened the moment Delbert would launch off of my hand for a cued flight.

Although it took him a bit of time, the way he gradually got past this challenge was by doing simple behaviours and getting reinforced. Delbert loves flying to new people.

So for some of our photos he got to fly back and forth between me and new people. This meant treats and attention that he loves.

Pairing doing simple A to B flights and getting reinforced made the background fade into …well, the background!

Delbert presented excellent flights on cue, posed like the super model he is for his close ups and enjoyed preening the hair on every head there. He also ended the day snoozing on the photographer’s shoulder, beak grinding away.

I suppose technically a photo shoot is “work” but I have to admit it sure felt like fun to me….and I think for Delbert too. (I think we were done shooting way before he decided it was time to wrap it up.) What made it fun was reading his body language and remembering to use positive reinforcement to make sure the experience was a good one for him too.

Hmmmm, maybe he has a future in modeling. Look out Zoolander…..here comes Delbert!

Find the newest products for your Parrot here.

This article was originally published on Good Bird’s blog in April 2010.

Barbara Heidenreich has been a professional animal trainer since 1990. Her company Barbara’s Force Free Animal Training (www.BarbarasFFAT.com) provides animal training DVDs, books, webinars and workshops. She has been a featured speaker in over twenty countries and has been published in nine languages. Barbara works with the companion animal community and also consults on animal training in zoos.